Monday, January 23, 2017

January work

 I've been continuing to re-evaluate my art on my days off from work. Things had gotten so messy around here that I've spent quite a lot of time sorting through and getting rid of several things. Books and magazines, extra art supplies, and so on, streamlining and focusing on my core loves.
  I'm focused on creating a piece for VisionCon and maybe some smaller things. To that end, here's my progress on both projects. Above is the progress so far of the art piece for it- a mermaid in a cave. It's at the bare beginning, but I think you can get a feel for the direction it's heading in. Below are a few of the barrettes I'm making. I'm going to try to cover most geeky subjects. I'm still working out the best way to create these and learning a lot as I go.

Now for some bad news. The quilt I submitted for a quilt show honoring women and their accomplishments was not juried in. What? you say. uh yeah, it happens and it feels really crappy. So, for a few days, you walk around in a funk and you second guess every single thing you did to make this. Since it's happened to me before, I'd felt crappy before and I probably will again. it's the price you pay (literally) when you put yourself out there. You question yourself, the jurors, the others' art, all sorts of things- but, in the end, hey, those two people didn't like my work. Ok. 
  What it leaves me with is a quilt that I don't know what to do with. Thus, the creation trap we fall into when we pursue shows. This show required a specific size, a certain format, a certain subject assigned to you (from a choice you submitted) and now it is too small for most other shows, too specific for others, in short- it was made for a particular show and it is not in that show now. I could get all philosophical about how every piece is worthy and teaches you something but- yeah lessons learned.  

So here's some I learned. Only make art about things you truly love or feel strongly about. Be true to your own artistic journey. Speak with your own artistic voice and then you can stand strong behind your work.
   So, lessons learned- Stop doing these shows that restrict you by size and techniques. Stop trying to fit your life into these themes. Only do art that you feel strongly about. And- personally for me- stop equating your artistic success with shows/sales. Relax. you've got a job- make art you love.

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